Categories
EXPERIMENTS IN DESIGN

Damask for the Masses: Part II

As the second piece in the punk damask series I wanted to pay homage to the mixtape. While audio cassettes have recently had a modest revival with hipsters and record companies for their low-cost in production and their difficulty in conversion to digital format, long gone are the days when people would share mixtapes.

I can remember how much it meant to me to get a mixtape from a friend. You could almost measure the depth of a meaningful friendship by the number of mixtapes that were carefully prepared and shared. The amount of time it would take to fill a 60 or 90 minute tape with carefully curated songs was always appreciated. How close the new music would match your personal preference or challenge your perceptions of music would also indicate how well your friend knew you. Sometimes songs were strategically recorded from the radio when they aired for the first time. Other times it was a collection of new favourites.

Single cassette punk damask unit

Explicit content was all the rage in middle school. It seemed like the parental advisory sticker was less a deterrent than it was a call to action.

Sometimes it was a way of sneaking music into the house that otherwise would have been banned from consumption by juvenile ears. Often purposely mislabeled “Tiffany” or “Wilson Phillips” these tapes would contain the likes of Mudhoney, Soundgarden, Nirvana, Ministry, the Ramones, Public Enemy and Pearl Jam. Explicit content was all the rage in middle school. It seemed like the parental advisory sticker was less a deterrent than it was a call to action. When a favourite band didn’t have the sticker they were said to have “gotten rid of their edge” to placate the PMRC. Looking back it seems as though it was just another form of rebellion that no one paid much attention to.

Full cassette punk damask wallpaper pattern

The mixtapes had a life of their own too. Played in a rogue player they could be warped, chewed and mangled, forever changing the playback and quality. My mixtapes were no strangers to the Canadian winter neither, often suffering from hypothermia and never fully recovering. Seeing as those mixtapes were unique (often the only ones of their kind in existence) they would still be played through the stretched and garbled sections and parts held together with Scotch tape. It meant I had a special version of a song that no one else had.

However, my mixtape collection is no more. I no longer own a cassette player. My love for all kinds of music has remained. But lost are the mixtapes of my youth.

Categories
DESIGN TUTORIALS

Creating Seamless Pattern Brushes in Illustrator for Just About Anything

As a graphic designer there is no end to the number of add-ons, brush sets, ornaments, images, filters, and other design tools out there for purchase. Some are amazing and save you a bit of time when trying to create that perfect look, but who has an unlimited fortune dedicated to buying tools you might only use once. Sometimes creating the brush you are looking for can take less time than searching for it on an online digital marketplace. In this tutorial, I go through the simple steps to take in creating an animal print pattern brush. Be sure to save your work often and make duplicate layers for each step so you can return to a previous step without using ⌘ + Z over and over again.

1) Find source material.

Find an image of a pattern from which to draw inspiration. Pexels is a good place to start as it has many images that can be used for free. For this tutorial, I am using just a section of zebra stripes for inspiration.

2) Draw your pattern in Illustrator.

Using the image as inspiration, set up an Illustrator file at 4″ x 4″ and Place (Shift (⇧) + ⌘ + P) the file on the Artboard. (The dimensions of the image don’t really make a difference.)

Lock the layer by clicking in the small square next to the eyeball on the layer that contains the image in your layers panel.

Window >> Layers then click on the [ ] in the layers panel beside the eye.

Set a maximum height to your pattern using guides by simply dragging guides from your ruler along the top of the workspace window. You can set up your ruler as follows…

View >> Rulers >> Show Rulers

In a new layer…

Window >> Layers then click on the [+] at the bottom of the layers panel

…start drawing shapes with the Pencil Tool (N) by loosely following the stripes in the zebra pattern while keeping the height of each stripe the same. Draw the stripes from the top guide to the bottom guide on the Artboard.

Don’t worry about the details. your stripes don’t need to look the exact same as the natural stripe patterns of the zebra image.

3) Duplicate your pattern and find the repeating point.

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Once you are happy with your pattern. Duplicate it by selecting the entire pattern and placing it directly beside itself.

Hold Alt/Option (⌥) + click (and hold) + hold Shift (⇧) + drag
in that order one after the other

Using the Pencil Tool (N), add in another stripe or two between the duplicated patterns to fill in the gaps. This should make the duplicate patterns look like one continuous pattern.

Select All (⌘ + A) and Group (⌘ + G) the patterns together. You should then consolidate the group by using ⌘ + 8 (Compound Path >> Make). This Command works by taking a group of several individual pieces and consolidates it so it can be treated like one object.

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Using your ruler on the left side of the workspace click + drag a guide to an anchor point on a repeating stripe within the pattern. Place a second guide on the exact same anchor point on the repeating stripe’s clone.

You should now have a frame made of four guides that contains the exact pattern you will use to make your brush. Draw a rectangle that fills the frame using the Rectangle Tool (M) by clicking and dragging from the top left corner of the frame to the bottom right corner of the frame.

Select All (⌘ + A) and click on the Intersect icon in the Pathfinder panel (Shift (⇧) + ⌘ + fn + F9). This will create a cropped version of the pattern that will be used to make the seamless pattern brush.

4) Create a seamless pattern brush.

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Drag and drop your new pattern into the Brushes panel (fn + F5). A dialogue box will pop-up with Scatter Brush, Art Brush and Pattern Brush as options.
Scatter Brush – is exactly as it sounds. A brush that scatters a pattern along a predetermined path. Cool for creating sparkles, specks, and dust in randomized patterns.
Art Brush – takes an object and stretches it along a path. It is great for recreating a single brush stroke with no repeating elements.
Pattern Brush – takes an object or pattern and repeats it along a path. It is great for funky borders and repeated elements in a predictable repeated pattern.

You’ll want to select Pattern Brush and click OK.

The next dialogue box will ask you to name the pattern. Name it something that will be easily recognizable, “zebra_v1” for example.

After you’ve named your pattern there are only a couple of settings that need to be changed in order for the seamless brush to work. The first setting to change will affect how the brush will handle sharp corners on the path outside of a shape.

Outer Corner Tile >> Auto-Centered

The Auto-Centered setting works best in adapting the brush to corners. The second setting to change is the Inner Corner Tile which will dictate how the brush will handle the corner on the path inside of a shape.

Inner Corner Tile >> Auto-Centered

Click OK.

5) Test your brush.

Simply draw a line with the Pencil Tool (N) and while that line selected find your new “zebra_v1” brush in your Brushes Panel (fn + F5). Click on it to apply the new brush to your pencilled path.

Voila!! A seamless pattern brush!! You can now manipulate it using the Stroke Panel, expand its appearance to use it as an object, and apply it to shapes or any complex path. This technique can now be used for animal print, florals, damask, and just about any other simple pattern.

If your brush didn’t quite work there are a few things that can be done to troubleshoot the problem. I’ve found the biggest issue can be in creating the perfect frame for the repeating pattern segment. Go back a few steps and try again. Feel free to DM me with your seamless pattern successes and failures.

Categories
EXPERIMENTS IN DESIGN

Damask for the Masses: Part I

I have always been intrigued with the ornate patterning of damask. The medieval botanical and whimsical flourishes intricately woven into beautiful infinite patterns are striking even by today’s standards. Damask’s versatility as a reversible fabric with an inverse colour pattern on the other side makes it even more interesting. While damask has a reputation for being ostentatious and overly dramatic, I felt it would be an interesting side project to attempt to blend damask patterning with a “punk/rock” sense of rebellion. A sort of damask for the masses. This first experiment discusses the origins of damask and attempts to blend traditional with the contemporary.

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Damask pattern has traditionally been associated with the wealthy and elite. Originally created in China and traded in the prosperous medieval craft centre of Damascus, the pattern’s namesake, damask became synonymous with the exotic and luxurious. Medieval kings and queens sought to acquire damask tapestries and textiles of their own because of their versatility and attractive design. In fact medieval royals went so far as to get monks to steal artisan secrets and smuggle silkworms to have ways of producing their own unique patterns. Damask textiles have seen a number of resurgences in popularity over the centuries. During the Baroque period, a period which was highlighted by artworks of grandeur and exuberance, damask was used in many different ways–including upholstery, wallpaper, and curtains. However, it was arguably at its peak in popularity during the Industrial Revolution. It was at this time, mass production made what was once considered a rich person’s textile into an affordable textile for the working middle class.

The modern technologies of today have led further towards the democratization of damask by making the pattern even easier to draw and produce. Traditional motifs have been cast aside for whatever patterns catch the eye of the consumer. Furthermore, damask has stepped away from the classic reversible fabric to one-sided prints in some instances. My experiment seeks to further the dialogue on what can be classified as damask through edgier and more “punk/rock” subject material. Not having access to a loom or a weaving mechanism myself (at this point in time) I am hoping to showcase the possible use of modern damask patterns through images and digital mock-ups.

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My first damask pattern in a series of patterns is a damask skull. This is what damask looks like when someone decides to meld traditional flourishes with edgier modern imagery. Skulls have become a bit of cliché in punk and rock so it was important to make sure the skull wasn’t too obvious and that it still contained traditional flourishes seen in older damask patterning. What has been created is something that was once held in such high regard as a luxurious, now given a new life in a different subculture.